Acupuncture (TCM) Cannabinoid Research

Acupuncture (TCM) Research Dashboard

11

Primary Studies

0

Related Studies

11

Total Studies

Clinical Studies

0

Clinical Meta-analyses

0

Double-blind human trials

0

Clinical human trials

Pre-Clinical Studies

1

Meta-analyses/Reviews

10

Animal studies

0

Laboratory studies

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CannaKeys has 11 studies associated with Acupuncture (TCM).

Here is a small sampling of Acupuncture (TCM) studies by title:


Components of the Acupuncture (TCM) Research Dashboard

  • Top medical conditions associated with Acupuncture (TCM)
  • Proven effects in clinical trials for Acupuncture (TCM)
  • Receptors associated with Acupuncture (TCM)
  • Individual study details for Acupuncture (TCM)

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Overview - Acupuncture (TCM)

Description of Acupuncture (TCM)

Acupuncture, a tool of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), involves the use of very fine needles that are placed very specifically on strategic points along or near the body’s subtle-energy channels or meridians. TCM posits that our life force, called qi (or chi), circulates through the meridians. In the Mandarin language, qi is synonymous with breath. According to TCM, if qi is blocked, out of balance, or weak, pain or disease results as a warning that something is wrong and needs adjusting. The general idea here is that to attain and maintain health and vitality, one must unblock, balance, and cultivate a healthy and free-flowing chi.

Not unlike cannabinoid-based approaches acupuncture induces complex therapeutic effects via modulation of diverse components of the ECS (e.g., AEA). More specifically, activation of endocannabinoid receptor sites (e.g. CB1, CB2), via indirect (allosteric) modulation of neurotransmitter receptors such as dopamine (e.g., D1, D2), GABA, or endogenous opioids (i.e., endorphins), which has led to the hypothesis that the ECS may be a primary mediator and regulatory factor of acupuncture's diverse therapeutic effects.

Other Names:

Acupuncture
Electroacupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

Acupuncture (TCM) Properties and Effects

Acupunture-based modulation of the ECS may induce synergistic effects with relevance to:
• Inflammation, inflammatory types of pain (e.g., Arthritis, contact dermatitis)
• Cardioprotective (via inhibiting sympathetic cardiovascular action)
• Alcohol withdrawal
• Analgesia (e.g., opioid-independent and orexin-initiated ECS-based pathway)
• Anxiety

Acupuncture (TCM) Receptor Binding

Endocannabinoid System (ECS)
• CB1
• CB2
• AEA
• FAAH
• 2-AG
• MAGL

Endocannabinoidome (eCBome)
• GABA
• Dopamine (e.g., D1, D2)
• Endogenous opioids (i.e., endorphins).

Disclaimers: Information on this site is provided for informational purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other medical professional. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing a health problem or disease. If using a product, you should read carefully all product packaging. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care provider.

Information on this site is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over-the-counter medication is also available. Consult your physician, nutritionally oriented health care practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications.